Llegamos para quedarnos: The new generation of Chilean politics

Karol CariolaSantiago de Chile with Costanegra Center05-Giorgio-Jackson.jpg04-Educacion-calle-01.jpg07-Melissa-Sepulveda.jpg06-Educacion-calle-03.jpgCamila Vallejo08-Educacion-calle-02ret.jpg09-Gabriel-Boric.jpg12-Sede-FECh.jpg10-Francisco-Figueroa.jpg11-Cristian-Cuevas.jpg13-Congreso.jpg

The year 2011 was a crucial year in the post-dictatorship Chile.
For a nation that has one of the most stable economies in Latin America,
private education in Chile (the most expensive in the world) is one of the main
causes of the immense social inequalities in this country.
Hundreds of thousands of students took to the streets to demand free and good public education.
Demonstrations around the country have challenged the right-wing government of Sebastián Piñera.
Since then, the student movement has become one of the most influential actors in national policy.
On March 11 2014, with the change to the new Bachelet’s government ,
some of the young leaders of those movements come to Congress as deputies.